Topic

Literacy Motivation

Description

Teachers have been trying to solve the puzzle of what motivates students to become engaged with literacy tasks in the classroom for decades. Researchers and teachers have long established that motivation to read impacts reading ability, but how do we foster a classroom environment that encourages students to want to read (Wigfield, Allan, & Guthrie, 2000)? Donalyn Miller said she realized every lesson she taught, every assignment she gave, “must lead students away from [her] and toward their autonomy as literate people (Miller, 2010).” The elevation of self-efficacy in this way has been shown to increase a student’s reading engagement (McKool, 2007). In addition to fostering a student’s autonomy, another key to reading motivation that has been identified, but not thoroughly explored, is how a student’s social network impacts their motivation (Brozo & Flynt, 2008).

Presenters will share literacy tasks that foster self-efficacy and collaboration, and the case for how they impact a student’s motivation for literacy engagement will be discussed (Chinn, Anderson & Waggoner, 2001).

References

Brozo, W., & Flynt, E. (2008). Content literacy: Motivating students to read in the

content classroom: Six evidence-based principles.The Reading Teacher, 62(2),

172-174.

Chinn, C., Anderson, R., & Waggoner, M. (2001). Patterns of discourse in two kinds of

literature discussion. Reading Research Quarterly, 36(4), 378-411.

McKool, S.S. (2007). Factors that influence the decision to read: An investigation of fifth grade

students’ out-of-school reading habits. Reading Improvement, 44(3), 111-131

Miller, D. (2010). The Book Whisperer: Awakening The Inner Reader in Every Child. San

Francisco, California: John Wiley & Sons.

Wigfield, A. and J.T. Guthrie (2000). Engagement and motivation in reading. Handbook of

Reading Research III, 403-422.

Event Website

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1PcSG5spqXV30-S9D_b_UhsiDObXtrvuE5CogTb2Cx-o/edit?usp=sharing

Start Date

4-26-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

4-26-2017 2:45 PM

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Import Event to Google Calendar

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Apr 26th, 1:00 PM Apr 26th, 2:45 PM

Unlocking Reading Motivation

Teachers have been trying to solve the puzzle of what motivates students to become engaged with literacy tasks in the classroom for decades. Researchers and teachers have long established that motivation to read impacts reading ability, but how do we foster a classroom environment that encourages students to want to read (Wigfield, Allan, & Guthrie, 2000)? Donalyn Miller said she realized every lesson she taught, every assignment she gave, “must lead students away from [her] and toward their autonomy as literate people (Miller, 2010).” The elevation of self-efficacy in this way has been shown to increase a student’s reading engagement (McKool, 2007). In addition to fostering a student’s autonomy, another key to reading motivation that has been identified, but not thoroughly explored, is how a student’s social network impacts their motivation (Brozo & Flynt, 2008).

Presenters will share literacy tasks that foster self-efficacy and collaboration, and the case for how they impact a student’s motivation for literacy engagement will be discussed (Chinn, Anderson & Waggoner, 2001).

References

Brozo, W., & Flynt, E. (2008). Content literacy: Motivating students to read in the

content classroom: Six evidence-based principles.The Reading Teacher, 62(2),

172-174.

Chinn, C., Anderson, R., & Waggoner, M. (2001). Patterns of discourse in two kinds of

literature discussion. Reading Research Quarterly, 36(4), 378-411.

McKool, S.S. (2007). Factors that influence the decision to read: An investigation of fifth grade

students’ out-of-school reading habits. Reading Improvement, 44(3), 111-131

Miller, D. (2010). The Book Whisperer: Awakening The Inner Reader in Every Child. San

Francisco, California: John Wiley & Sons.

Wigfield, A. and J.T. Guthrie (2000). Engagement and motivation in reading. Handbook of

Reading Research III, 403-422.

http://digitalcommons.longwood.edu/grs/2017/Wednesday/31

 

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