Description

Before they leave our classrooms, we want to ensure that all students can think critically, analyze complex information, work collaboratively, and seamlessly apply prior knowledge to new situations. All of these essential skills can be achieved by incorporating more literacy practices into content area classes (Aslan, 2016). Unfortunately, in many cases, effective literacy practices are either not being implemented or lack authentic integration with the content (Ness, 2016). With jam-packed curriculum, constant testing, overflowing classrooms, and lack of specialized training, content area teachers sometimes think that they do not have enough time for reading instruction. They can also feel “discredited” when reading appears to be valued more than their own subject area. (Fisher & Ivey, G. 2005). This session will address evidence supporting content-area literacy, provide promising strategies, and make the case that effective integration of content and literacy learning allows us to find the time for both.

References

Aslan, Y. (2016). The effect of cross-curricular instruction on reading comprehension. Universal Journal Of Educational Research, 4(8), 1797-1801.

Fisher, D., & Ivey, G. (2005). Literacy and language as learning in content-area classes: A departure from "every teacher a teacher of reading". Action In Teacher Education, 27(2), 3-11.

Ness, M. K. (2016). Reading comprehension strategies in secondary content area classrooms: Teacher use of and attitudes towards reading comprehension instruction. Reading Horizons (Online), 55(1), 58-84.

Subject Categories

Intermediate, Middle/ Jr. High

Start Date

4-26-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

4-26-2017 5:45 PM

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Apr 26th, 4:00 PM Apr 26th, 5:45 PM

“Who Has Time For That?”: Effectively Integrating Disciplinary Literacy Practices

Before they leave our classrooms, we want to ensure that all students can think critically, analyze complex information, work collaboratively, and seamlessly apply prior knowledge to new situations. All of these essential skills can be achieved by incorporating more literacy practices into content area classes (Aslan, 2016). Unfortunately, in many cases, effective literacy practices are either not being implemented or lack authentic integration with the content (Ness, 2016). With jam-packed curriculum, constant testing, overflowing classrooms, and lack of specialized training, content area teachers sometimes think that they do not have enough time for reading instruction. They can also feel “discredited” when reading appears to be valued more than their own subject area. (Fisher & Ivey, G. 2005). This session will address evidence supporting content-area literacy, provide promising strategies, and make the case that effective integration of content and literacy learning allows us to find the time for both.

References

Aslan, Y. (2016). The effect of cross-curricular instruction on reading comprehension. Universal Journal Of Educational Research, 4(8), 1797-1801.

Fisher, D., & Ivey, G. (2005). Literacy and language as learning in content-area classes: A departure from "every teacher a teacher of reading". Action In Teacher Education, 27(2), 3-11.

Ness, M. K. (2016). Reading comprehension strategies in secondary content area classrooms: Teacher use of and attitudes towards reading comprehension instruction. Reading Horizons (Online), 55(1), 58-84.