Date of Award

11-17-2003

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Liberal Studies

First Advisor

Rachel Mathews, Ed.D.

Second Advisor

Ruth Meese, Ph.D.

Third Advisor

Christopher Jones, Ph.D.

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to examine praise and its effects on help-seeking behavior, trust, and self-perception as well as how different age groups respond to praise. the participants were 11 female students with disabilities and low achievers ranging in ages from 12-17 and up chosen through convenience sampling. Praise as a specific intervention was examined using a self-developed, Likert- type, 16 item questionnaire. The data were analyzed using Pearson 'r'. No significant relationship was found between praise and help-seeking (r=.36, P> .05) or praise and self-perception (r=36, p> .05). However, a significant relationship was found between praise and trust (p=1.00, p

 
 

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